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Jul232011

A Lightweight Rower's Diet

By: Patrick Dale.
From: Live Strong: Lance Armstrong Foundation.

Overview: A lightweight Rower's Diet

Rowing is a relatively old sport whose governing body, the International Rowing Federation, was formed in 1892. Rowers compete individually or in crews of two, four or eight and are categorized by weight: Lightweight men must weigh less than 72.5 kg or 160 lbs. while lightweight women must weigh less than 59 kg or 130 lbs. Rowers weighing more than these figures are classed as heavyweights. Lightweight rowers must be careful not to gain too much weight otherwise they will find themselves ineligible for lightweight competition. For this reason, diet is especially important for lightweight rowers.

About Rowing

Rowing is a demanding whole-body sport that requires strength, power and fitness. The legs, back and arms are especially important in rowing. Rowing with one oar is called sweep rowing while using two oars is called sculling. Both types of rowing require very high levels of fitness. Training for rowing is vigorous and includes not just rowing but also weight training, circuit training and running or cycling. According to "The Sports Book" by Ray Stubbs, rowers consume an average of 6,000 calories per day to fuel their training, but this very much depends on the size of the rower and amount of training being performed. 

About Rowing

Rowing is a demanding whole-body sport that requires strength, power and fitness. The legs, back and arms are especially important in rowing. Rowing with one oar is called sweep rowing while using two oars is called sculling. Both types of rowing require very high levels of fitness. Training for rowing is vigorous and includes not just rowing but also weight training, circuit training and running or cycling. According to "The Sports Book" by Ray Stubbs, rowers consume an average of 6,000 calories per day to fuel their training, but this very much depends on the size of the rower and amount of training being performed.

Fueling Workouts

The primary fuel in rowing workouts is carbohydrate. Carbohydrate from foods such as bread, rice, pasta, fruit and vegetables is broken down and converted to glucose to provide energy for muscular contractions. Hard-training rowers should ensure they consume enough carbohydrates to fuel their rigorous workouts. Sports nutritionist and author Anita Bean recommends that hard-training rowers should consume 8 to 10 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of body weight. Carbohydrates also provide plenty of vitamins, minerals and fiber, so rowers should try to eat wholesome sources of carbohydrates while limiting the consumption of refined foods and sugars. 

Muscle Repair

Rowing and rowing training cause muscle damage at a cellular level. With adequate rest and good nutrition, muscles repair themselves and get stronger. The primary nutrient required for post exercise muscle repair is protein. Rowers should consume around 1.2 to 1.6 g of protein per kilogram of body weight to ensure they have adequate protein to repair their muscles after intense exercise. Good protein foods include beef, pork, chicken, turkey, fish and eggs. Protein consumption should be spread evenly throughout the day to ensure muscles receive a regular supply of protein-derived amino acids.

Fats

Although fats are very calorie dense, they are also important for health. Fats are essential for the transportation and utilization of vitamins and minerals, are anti-inflammatory and a useful source of energy. Because fat provides a lot of calories, lightweight rowers should be careful not to consume too much fat in order to avoid gaining weight. Most experts agree that around 30 percent of calories should be derived from fat and split evenly among saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat.

Weight Management

Unlike heavyweight rowers who have no upper weight limit, lightweight rowers much avoid getting too heavy - especially as the competitive season approaches. To maintain your body weight, your calorie intake must equal your calorie expenditure. If you are over your correct rowing weight, you should endeavor to start your weight-loss diet in plenty of time before the season to avoid having to crash diet which may affect your rowing training due to reduced energy levels. By setting the goal of 1 lb. per week, you can estimate how long it will take you to get to your correct competitive weight. To lose 1 lb. a week, you need to reduce your calorie intake by around 500 calories a day.

References

"The Sports Book"; Ray Stubbs; 2009

"The Complete Guide to Sports Nutrition"; Anita Bean; 2009 

"Nancy Clark's Sports Nutrition Guidebook"; Nancy Clark; 2008

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